KYPHOPLASTY

Balloon kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive surgical technique to treat vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis.

WHAT IS OSTEOPOROSIS?

Osteoporosis is a debilitating bone disease that results in a reduction of bone mass
Predisposing the patient to an increased risk of vertebral and other fractures. Of all
The fractures vertebral compression fractures are the most common but the least
Treated in the past.

WHY SHOULD WE TREAT VERTEBRAL COMPRESSION FRACTURES?

Vertebral compression fractures ultimately leads to spinal deformity and more fractures. Deformity and chronic pain leads to decreased function and mobility. Decreased mobility leads to more bone loss. Deformity leads to a decreased lung function. In time the patient will experience a loss of appetite, sleep disorders, increased depression and social dependence on others, diminished social roles and self esteem ect.

TREATMENT OBJECTIVES

Early diagnosis
Relief of pain
Restoration of anatomy
Prevention of more fractures

HOW DO I KNOW I HAVE A FRACTURE?

If you experience sudden acute pain after a minor fall or other minor incident.
Consult your doctor and ask him to take an x-ray of your spine. The best way, however, to diagnose a fresh fracture of your spine is to do a MRI study with STIR weighted images. It is important to do this sooner than later because the fracture can become untreatable very quickly.

IS CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF A FRACTURE STILL INDICATED?

Yes. With weekly follow up your doctor can determine whether the fracture progresses to more collapse by taking serial weekly x-rays. If there is no progression the fracture can be treated conservatively. When the fracture is healed your doctor should start preventative treatment. Consult him about this.

KYPHOPLASTY OBJECTIVES

To take away the pain caused by the fracture.
To internally splint the fracture.
To prevent deformity or to restore deformity depending on the age of the fracture.
To increase mobility and preventing more bone loss caused by bed rest.
To prevent the use of pain and anti-inflammatory medications and the use of external splints.

HOW IS KYPHOPLASTY DONE?

Kyphoplasty is done under a light general anaesthesia. Under sterile conditions and with x-ray positioning in place, a needle is passed through skin into the fractured vertebral body on both sides. After several more steps to ensure correct placement of the working channels two inflatable balloons is passed inside the vertebral body into the fracture. The balloons are slowly inflated to try and restore height loss caused by the fracture and also to create a bone void. The balloons are then removed and through the same working channels bone cement is introduced in the void created by the balloons. The cement is introduced slowly and in a low flow state so that the surgeon has control over the flow of the cement. The instruments is removed and two stitches per level applied. It takes 30-60 minutes per level. After surgery the patient may sit and walk with no support and usually leaves the hospital the next morning. Follow up is necessary to remove stitches and to start preventative treatment. If you develop severe pain any time after surgery you have a new fracture until proven otherwise.

A needle is passed into the fractured vertebral body
Inflatable balloons is passed inside the vertebral body
Cement is introduced in the void
Restoration of vertebral body

WHO DOES KYPHOPLASTY?

The company Kyphon makes sure that surgeons are fully trained and capable to do this delicate and dangerous procedure. Surgeons that are not trained will not get the instruments to do it. There are about 50 trained surgeons in the country accredited to do the procedure. No complications to date make it a safe procedure in the right hands. For more information please visit www.kyphon.com

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